Look at us.

We went to a hockey game the other night. It’s local hockey, the kind that constantly shows the faces from people in the crowd on the big screen over center ice.

It was fun watching people realize they were on the screen and start to smile. And then they got confused. If they looked at their image on the screen, they weren’t looking at us. If they looked at us (at the camera), they couldn’t see themselves.

One person all night looked at the camera. Everyone else looked at themselves.  And saw the side of their head.

I realized that we do this all the time. We want to see ourselves on the big screen. So we can say, “I saw myself on the big screen.”  Except for that handful of people who understand that they will have more impact, will look better, will see other people if they look right into the camera, or into the eyes across the table.

So, in the interest of better communication, “here’s looking at you.”

Except Fort Wayne Komets Zambonime? I don’t care about the big screen at all.

I want to drive the Zamboni.

6 responses to “Look at us.

  1. The Zamboni would be fun, but the little lawn tractor looks like a kick in the pants. Good thoughts.

  2. What a great parable. As usual, you have given me something to think about.

    In my thinking, writing and speaking, I refer to the thing you describe as “meeting the gaze.” The ability and willingness to meet the gaze leads to every sort of possibility, including being on the big screen. But, as you pointed out, one price of doing so is to never really see yourself there.

    Your posts are a gift in my inbox, Jon, and testament that you are willing to meet the gaze.

  3. Scott – it’s actually a four-wheel ATV. Great fun. Operating the R/C blimp would be fun, too.

    Kay – I love the idea of “meeting the gaze”. The interesting thing is taht it is possible to see ourselves more accurately in the gaze. As it is true that many of us, for good and ill, deceive ourselves about ourselves.

  4. I agree completely, Jon. Meeting the gaze can lead to every sort of insight. Its only downside is the one you described in your parable.

  5. you just wanted to use Zamboni in a sentence. I know you.

  6. you mean, to polish the prose of a sentence?