sometimes music takes other people

I started humming the carol of the bells. You know the one: ding ding ding ding, ding ding ding ding.

Maybe it doesn’t translate to text so well.

I started humming it and then realized that in our living room we had, temporarily, a set of choir chimes. Choir chimes are what they have for kids to play when they don’t trust the kids with handbells. They sound a lot like bells, unless you compare them to bells.

I opened the case and started asking Hope what the notes were. She just happened to have the music and pulled out the three chimes we needed to play the first four notes. She took two. I took one. It sounded cool.

Then she handed me another and then we got Nancy and gave her two chimes and we tried to play. My part was too confusing, partially because I had never tried to actually play as part of music before. So I took Hope’s chimes.

Right left right hope. right left right hope. That’s how the notes go.

But I kept trying to do it myself. I would play right left right left. Wrong. I would play right left right and then point. But when you point with a chime, it rings.

I discovered that as much as I wanted to play the music, as much as I heard it in  my head, I couldn’t do it myself.

We couldn’t do it together either. We didn’t have all the music. But we laughed and we sometimes got eight notes in a row.

If you are playing choir chimes, you can’t get music if you do it yourself.

I think that’s what community is for. I think that’s how church is intended to be. I think that people are actually made to get the music by choosing to not play everyone else’s part but to play their part well, together.

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Speaking of bells, hear that ringing sound? It’s my virtual Red Kettle.  If you are shopping for Christmas online, you can give online, too. If you want to.

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7 responses to “sometimes music takes other people

  1. You struck a chord! I think that’s what community is for. I think that’s how church is intended to be. I think that people are actually made to get the music by choosing to not play everyone else’s part but to play their part well, together.” A friend says everyone has strengths and weaknesses starting with me. I am working on trying to play my part well in life, in all the interactions I have in a given day.

  2. Thanks Julie. I love the both/and nature of your friend’s comment ( I have
    weakness, I have strengths).

  3. What a wonderfully clear illustration for the season, Jon! Thanks for giving it to us today; gonna have to remember that one…

  4. thank you robert. i’ll try to remember, too…

  5. i am sure this is a cool post
    but i could not get past the “point”
    because i could see it perfectly
    the point and the ring
    and you *know* we’d all guffaw if we were all there together watching

  6. Kat,yes you were *seeing* it perfectly, and we were guffawing. Perhaps we should make a video.

  7. you know, there probably is a time for not making metaphors, for just
    laughing.

    I gotta remember that.